New Nissan Technology Prevents Parents from Leaving Children in Cars | Mempawah Satu

New Nissan Technology Prevents Parents from Leaving Children in Cars

08 September 2019, 2:13 AM
Rear Door Alert warning feature on Nissan cars prevents parents from leaving their children in the car. (Image/jawapos.com)
MEMPAWAHSATU.ME - Japanese car manufacturer, Nissan, wants to introduce a technology or feature called Rear Door Alert (RDA).

This feature is useful to remind vehicle users that they have left luggage in the rear cabin of the car.

Quoted JawaPos.com from DailyVoice, Friday (6/9), the feature is not only useful to prevent vehicle users from leaving goods in a car that has the potential to cause losses such as when a theft occurs.

Furthermore, the RDA feature can also help prevent vehicle users from leaving their children in the car.

The way this feature works is with sensors that detect when the back door is opened and closed.

The sensor will work before or after the car is running. If the back door is opened before the trip, and then it is not opened again after the car is parked, the system will alert the driver about it.

The warning will be displayed on the instrument panel. If the warning is ignored by the car driver while still leaving the car without opening the back door, the system will automatically sound the horn repeatedly.

This is what prevents them from leaving their belongings or children in the car because they inevitably have to open the back door of the car again before leaving it.

This feature is said to help save the life of a child left behind in a vehicle and trapped in hot air.

The car will provide a warning sound which is now standard on 10 Nissan cars from all 2019 models.

This technology is expected to be extended to many models going forward. Last year, there were 52 reported deaths related to children left in the car.

According to the company, back door warning technology will monitor the switch on the back door before and after the trip.

If the driver walks away from the vehicle without checking the back seat, they will be notified.

Other car companies are expected to introduce similar technology into future vehicle models.

Nissan said the company plans to have a rear door warning as a standard feature on all four-door models no later than 2022.

Leaving a child in the back seat during the summer is rife in the list of local news reports. That obviously raises the concerns of parents.

The problem is potentially fatal and is trying to be solved by car makers. Other electronic caretakers on vehicles are worth considering.

Not only Nissan, CarAndDrive page mentions that other manufacturers also plan to implement similar technology.

The manufacturer in question is the Hyundai with Ultrasonic Rear Occupant Alert features.

Said to be more advanced than Nissan's, a similar feature on a Hyundai car will work with a motion sensor system.

First, when the driver exits the car, the dashboard displays a message reminding them to check the back seat.

If the ultrasonic sensor of the car detects movement in the back seat when the vehicle is parked and locked, the car horn will sound and the lights turn on.

These features can also be connected to the driver's smartphone device via Blue Link.

If the driver's phone is connected via the Hyundai Blue Link telematics system, a text message will be sent to the phone that there is a detected motion in the car which may be the son of the car owner who was either intentionally or not left inside.

KidsAndCars.org advocacy group said that an average of 38 children in the United States (US) died in the car due to heat.

As of August 1, the group has tracked 25 child deaths as a result of being left in a car throughout 2019.

One of the main reasons for these deaths is because parents do not realize how fast the interior of the car is heating up or do not know that a child's body can overheat three to five times faster than an adult.

Similar features are also rumored to be a standard for General Motor (GM) alerts.

Translated from the website www.jawapos.com

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